My Ideal (Easy) House Plants

 Left: succulents, Right: tray of plants I bought home

Left: succulents, Right: tray of plants I bought home

So for quite some time now people have been asking me about my house plants: how I take care of them, what ones I have, and which I'd recommend to a novice plant-carer. I've done two videos (1) (2) on plants in the past but it seems a lot of people keep missing them, so why not just put it in a blog post! I won't go through all the ones I own, but I decided to compile a list of plants that I currently have that I think would be a good fit for someone who'd like to own more but doesn't know where to begin.

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 Left: succulents, Right: painting the pot of a pre-planted cactus

Left: succulents, Right: painting the pot of a pre-planted cactus

1. SUCCULENTS

It's no secret that succulents are very easy to take care of. They require very little water, and very little maintenance. I'd recommend succulents for anyone who is still learning how to take care of plants and finds themselves killing their indoor garden pals on the regular. Succulents should be planted in a soil mix that is 2 parts potting soil and 1 part fine gravel (eg crushed granite), this is to ensure that the soil drains well. They can be planted in a variety of different containers, and look great in terrariums.

 Right: cacti

Right: cacti

2. FIDDLE LEAF FIG

The fiddle leaf fig had a huge moment a year or two ago, where it seemed like everyone owned one. These plants can grow to be over 6 foot tall and are fairly easy to maintain. In good conditions they can grow quite quickly, and should have their pot size upgraded if you're looking for them to get taller. Figs, unfortunately, are toxic to dogs, so unless you have a pooch that you can guarantee won't touch it, fiddle leaf figs should be kept out of reach or out of the home completely.

 Left: fiddle leaf fig, Right: planting

Left: fiddle leaf fig, Right: planting

3. POTHOS (devil's ivy)

Pothos is another one which is toxic to both dogs and cats (and also children), and so should be kept away or completely out of the house. I have a few which live high up, and trimmed to keep out of reach of my dog, even though she usually doesn't display any interest in my plants. Pothos will grow in bright, indirect sunlight (one of mine is waaay at the front of my apartment, which isn't near any windows), and the plant will even do well in low light. The more green on the leaves of your Pothos, the lower light conditions it will be able to tolerate. If the leaves are very light it will need to be closer to a light source. This plant does not just have to live in soil, it will also comfortably grow in water, making a cool addition to your interior decor.

 Left: Pothos, Right: Pothos and Golden Cane Palm

Left: Pothos, Right: Pothos and Golden Cane Palm

4. GOLDEN CANE PALM

Potted palms are a fuss-free edition to add to your plant collection, it doesn't mind shade, but will even do well in full sun. The larger the pot your palm is in, the taller it will be able to grow, so it may need re-potting if you'd like it to grow taller. They like when you add water crystals and slow-release fertiliser into the potting mix, which keeps their maintenance fairly low. Golden cane leaves can turn yellow and drop as the plant starts to sprout new leaves, so they require trimming every now and again.

 Left: Selaginella, Right: Pothos and cacti

Left: Selaginella, Right: Pothos and cacti

5. CACTI

If you kill cacti, I'm telling you, you are probably over-watering them, or the soil does not drain well. Your cacti need to be planted in soil that will allow the water to drain out easily, so that the roots aren't sitting in soil that's too moist. Planting your cacti too deep into the soil will also lead to their demise, the roots need to be fairly close to the top of the soil, cacti should only be planted deep enough to stay upright. Other than this they need to be in a fairly well-lit space.

 Right: Hoya 'Indian Rope' Plant and a succulent

Right: Hoya 'Indian Rope' Plant and a succulent

6. INDIAN ROPE PLANT

Indian rope plants grow best in bright light. They're a species of succulent and require very little water to survive. They should be fertalised during the warmer months, and kept out of the cold (anything below 10C is a no-go for this plant). If you can keep them alive for long enough they will produce some beautiful flowers for you!

7. zz plant (fat boy)

Also going by the name 'Eternity Plant', this thing just does not die (unless you overwater it). It does prefer slightly warmer weather where possible, and from what I've found, seems to like soft light more than direct sunlight. The ZZ Plant can tolerate very little water, and should be planted in well-draining soil - it's very hardy!

 Left: golden cane palm, monstera deliciosa, Right: ZZ plant

Left: golden cane palm, monstera deliciosa, Right: ZZ plant

8. Monstera deliciosa (swiss cheese plant)

This Monstera can either be grown outdoors in shade, or indoors in a bright spot (not direct sunlight, just well lit). There should be slow-release fertiliser in the soil, with the potting mix being kept moist during warm months and drier during the colder months. This plant prefers the warmer weather, and can grow up to 4 metres tall if you'll let it!